Sunday, November 23, 2014

CREATE A WILDLIFE-FRIENDLY YARD


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     With America's 25 million acres of lawns, this site is dedicated to encouraging people to create wildlife-friendly spaces in their yards and at their places of business. We share ideas on how to do this, so Contact Us- we'd enjoy hearing from you!

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MONARCH BUTTERFLIES BENEFITED FROM THE "BUTTERFLY LADY"

Doris Nettleman Stifel holds a case with female and male monarchs and, at bottom, a viceroy butterfly.
Toledo's Butterfly Lady
     I ran across this article in the Toledo Blade newspaper about a woman who passed away several years ago. She was a lady who loved monarchs and other butterflies. The article was actually her obituary, but it impressed me. It was written by Mark Zaborney, the Blade's staff writer. This photo is of  Doris Nettleman Stifel, as she holds up a case with female and male monarchs. At the bottom is a viceroy butterfly. She was known locally as Toledo’s Butterfly Lady, but she was recognized internationally as an expert on the migration of monarchs and who single-handedly tagged tens of thousands. The article was written shortly after she died in Swan Creek Care Center at age 89.
     A man named Duke Wheeler opened the Butterfly House near Whitehouse, Ohio in 2001 as a showcase and sanctuary, and he consulted with Mrs. Stifel. She continued to train the staff and Mr. Wheeler said, “She had so much enthusiasm and knowledge. She was our guiding light for years.”
     Mrs. Stifel was a career scientist who’d aspired to be a physician, but her interest in nature dated from childhood summers spent at her family’s Evans Lake cottage in southeast Michigan’s Irish Hills. In the 1970s, she read about a Cleveland Museum of Natural History field trip on how to tag Danaus plexippus — the monarch butterfly. She bought a membership that day and within weeks was teaching field-trip participants.
     It was only in the early 1970s that researchers from the north confirmed wintering sites in Mexico for the eastern North American monarch. A decade later, monarchs that had been tagged on Kelleys Island were found in central Texas and central Mexico, establishing that monarchs fly a Great Lakes-to-Mexico migratory pattern.
     Mrs. Stifel was a dogged tagger of monarchs, roaming the Lake Erie shore with a butterfly net to catch and then affix a numbered bit of paper to a wing. In 1986, she attracted international attention with the recovery in Mexico of two monarchs tagged months earlier, and 1,500 miles away, in an eastern Lucas County clover field. Until then, no other monarch researcher was credited with more than one recovery, even though thousands were tagged every fall. In the next two years, her reputation soared as monarchs she tagged continued to be found elsewhere — in Mexico, but also Indiana and Kentucky. She raised as many as 600 monarchs a summer from eggs, tagged them, and released them.
     “The more we know about nature, the more we should know about our way of living,” Mrs. Stifel told The Blade in 1996. She recruited others to her cause, teaching them about the monarch and how to tag. She campaigned against pesticides and the frequent mowing of ditch and roadside vegetation, which she said contributed to a decline in butterfly activity.
     She also was a birder and a volunteer bald eagle nest watcher for the Ohio Division of Wildlife. She’d been a board and executive committee member of the Nature Conservancy’s Ohio chapter. Not surprisingly, she said in 1995, walking among the milkweed in search of monarch eggs, “I get a kick out of it too. School buses have gone by, and the children stick their head out the window and yell, ‘Hey, Butterfly Lady!’ ”
     She was named naturalist of the year in 1995 by the Toledo Naturalists’ Association. In 2006, a gazebo to house the monarch project at Maumee Bay State Park was named in her honor.

Robert Morton, M.Ed., Ed.S. is dedicated to creating wildlife-friendly yards. Click HERE to make your yard wildlife-friendly by creating a Monarch Waystation.  He'd enjoy hearing from you- press HERE to contact him. 

Monday, November 3, 2014

A BRUSH PILE IN YOUR YARD IS FOR THE BIRDS!

As a member of the Black Swamp Bird Observatory (BSBO), I receive their email newsletter. In the latest one, they shared an easy tip for helping birds in your yard by constructing a brush pile. It is easy to build one and it doesn't require much space, and is maintenance free. The best thing about a brush pile is it helps birds and other little critters by offering shelter from predators and all types of weather conditions.

The BSBO encourages you to build your own brush pile today! It is a great family project and it is so cool to look out the window and see birds utilizing this simple pile of sticks as a shelter.  

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Order online
  • FIVE KEY CONCEPTS TO CREATE A WILDLIFE-FRIENLY YARD (click HERE)
  • MONARCH WAYSTATION NO. 613- KATYDID IS MASTER OF DISGUISE! (click HERE)
  • ENDANGERED MONARCH BUTTERFLY IS CANARY IN THE COAL MINE (click HERE)
  • CATERPILLARS AND THEIR HOST PLANTS (click HERE)
  • MONARCH CATERPILLAR KILLED BY TACHNID FLY (click HERE)
  • MONARCH WAYSTATION NO. 613- MONARCHS BACK IN NW OHIO! (click HERE)
  • RAISING MONARCH BUTTERFLIES AT WAYSTATION NO. 613 (click HERE)
  • MONARCH BUTTERFLY POPULATION TOOK A HIT! (click HERE)
  • CANADIAN PETROPHILA MOTH COMMON ALONG SANDUSKY RIVER (click HERE)
  • MONARCH BUTTERFLIES LAYING EGGS EARLY IN NW OHIO (click HERE)
  • NEW OHIO BIRD BOOKSTORE SPECIALIZES IN OHIO BIRDS (click HERE)
  • INTRODUCE CHILDREN BACK TO NATURE IN YOUR OWN BACKYARD (Click HERE)
  • LEARN HOW TO CREATE A BUTTERFLY GARDEN! (Click HERE)
  • MONARCH WAYSTATION NO. 613 READY TO BEGIN NEW RESEARCH (Click HERE)
  • FIGHT NATURE DEFICIT-DISORDER- INTRODUCE YOUR KIDS TO THE OUTDOORS! (click HERE)
  • BALD EAGLE DOES THE BREAST STROKE (click HERE)
  • VICEROY BUTTERFLY NOT A MIMIC OF MONARCH (click HERE)
  • WONDERFUL CHILDREN'S BOOKS ON MONARCH BUTTERFLIES! (click HERE)
  • (A-74) MONARCH SEASON OVER AT WAYSTATION #613 (click HERE)
  • (A-73) MONARCH BUTTERFLIES ON EXUMA ISLAND, BAHAMAS (click HERE)
  • (A-72) SAVE A CHILD FROM NATURE DEFICIT DISORDER (click HERE)
  • (A-71) COMMUNITY WILDLIFE HABITAT IN LAKE NORMAN (click HERE)
  • (A-70) MY LAST MONARCH BUTTERFLY AT WAYSTATION #613 (click HERE)
  • (A-69) MONARCH WAYSTATIONS AMPLIFY BIODIVERSITY & COUNTER URBAN SPRAWL (click HERE)
  • (A-68) THE WOMAN WHO RAISES MONARCH BUTTERFLIES (click HERE)
Burpee.com - Earth Day HP Image
  • (A-57) MONARCHS VACANT AT CREEKBEND FARM PRAIRIE IN NW OHIO (click HERE)
  • (A-56) MONARCHS LAYING EGGS GALORE IN NW OHIO! (click HERE)
  • (A-55) CEDAR WAXWING MALES FEED FEMALES (click HERE)
  • (A-53) MONARCH POPULATION OVERWINTERING IN MEXICO REMAINS LOW (click HERE)
  • (A-52) BIRDS PREFER OLDER NEIGHBORHOODS WITH MATURE TREES (click HERE)
  • (A-51) BACKYARD GARDENS FOR WILDLIFE (click HERE)
  • (A-50) BIRD SONG SURVEY- WHAT ARE YOUR TOP TWO FAVORITE BIRD SONGS? (click HERE)
  • (A-49) IDENTIFY BIRDS ONLINE- 6 GREAT WEBSITES (click HERE)
  • (A-48) BENEFICIAL INSECTS SUFFER CATASTROPHIC HABITAT LOSS (click HERE)
  • (A-47) MONARCH WAYSTATION #613 IN NW OHIO (click HERE)
  • (A-46) DR. RYAN NORRIS OF MONARCH MIGRATION RESEARCH (click HERE)
  • (A-44) MONARCHS CROSS APPALACHIANS FROM WEST TO POPULATE N. AMERICAN EAST COAST (click HERE)
  • (A-43) CRITICAL TOXINS EMISSIONS OHIO EPA HEARING THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11th IN COLUMBUS, OHIO (click HERE)
  • (A-42) BACK TO THE WILD! SAVES THOUSANDS OF BIRDS (click HERE)
  • (A-41) ENVIRONMENTAL TOXINS HARM OUR CHILDREN (click HERE)
  • (A-40) CREATE WILDLIFE-FRIENDLY SPACES IN YOUR YARD (click HERE)
  • (A-39) INJURED HUMMINGBIRD BABY NURTURED BACK TO GOOD HEALTH (click HERE)

  • (A-38) NATURE JOURNAL: CAVITY TREES PROVIDE MINI-SANCTUARIES TO WILDLIFE (click HERE)
  • (A-37) ARE SHREWS KILLING BIRDS VISITING YOUR FEEDERS? (click HERE)
  • (A-36) BALD EAGLES & WINTER BIRDS SURVIVE (click HERE) (A-35) COOPER'S HAWK KILLS AT BIRD FEEDERS (click HERE)(A-34) BIRD & BUTTERFLIES ADD EXCITEMENT TO YOUR YARD (click HERE)(A-33) BACKYARD WILDLIFE PROVIDE WINTER ENTERTAINMENT IN NW OHIO (click HERE) (A-32) BIODIVERSITY ENHANCED WITH NATURE PRESERVES (click HERE)(A-30) GOD SPEAKS ABOUT WILDLIFE-FRIENDLY YARDS (click HERE)(A-29) BUTTERFLY HUNT! SPONSORED BY ERIE METROPARKS AT STEINEN WILDLIFE AREA (click HERE)(A-28) STALKING THE LAKESIDE DAISY- OHIO'S RAREST NATIVE PLANT (click HERE)
  • (A-27) MONARCH BUTTERFLY AWARENESS HAPPENS WITH DANA BOLIN AT MAUMEE BAY STATE PARK (click HERE)
  • (A-26) MONARCH WAYSTATION # 613- MONARCH OBSERVATIONS WAY DOWN IN NW OHIO FROM THIS TIME LAST YEAR (click HERE)
  • (A-25) STARLINGS PERFORM INCREDIBLE AERODYNAMICS! (click HERE)
  • (A-24) HUMMINGBIRD BABY NURSED BACK TO HEALTH (click HERE)
  • (A-23) VIBURNUM, WISTERIA & HONEYSUCKLE HEDGE FOR WILDLIFE (click HERE)
  • (A-22) CREATE A MONARCH WAYSTATION IN YOUR YARD! (click HERE)
  • (A-21) ALDO LEOPOLD: A LEGENDARY CONSERVATIONIST (click HERE)
  • (A-20) BIODIVERSITY FLOURISHES IN MY WILDLIFE-FRIENDLY YARD (click HERE)
  • (A-19) A VIDEO FOR RED-SHOULDERED HAWK LOVERS (click HERE)
  • (A-18) SHARP-SHINNED HAWK DEVOURS STARLING (click HERE)
  • (A-17) WINNERS OF MYSTERY BIRD CONTEST NO. 2! (click HERE)
  • (A-16) VIDEO ON BASICS IN CREATING A WILDLIFE FRIENDLY YARD. IF YOU BUILD IT...THEY WILL COME! (click HERE)
  • (A-15) HAWK, KITE & EAGLE CLOSE-UPS (click HERE)
  • (A-14) MYSTERY BIRD CONTEST NO. 2- WHAT IS IT? (click HERE)
  • (A-13) ANNE MURRAY SINGS ABOUT SNOW BUNTINGS! (click HERE)
  • (A-12) PEREGRINE FALCON ATTACKS RED-TAIL HAWK VIDEO (click HERE)

  • (A-11) REDPOLL FRENZY! (click HERE)
  • (A-10) WINNERS OF THE MYSTERY BIRD CONTEST (click HERE)
  • (A-9) SQUIRRLES- A PAIN IN THE ARSE OR ENTERTAINING CLOWNS? YOU DECIDE (click HERE)
  • (A-8) MYSTERY BIRD CONTEST- WHAT IS IT? (click HERE)
  • (A-6) NATURE NOTE 11/2/03- TRUMPETER SWANS! (click HERE)
  • (A-4) "Fluctuations in the numbers of the Monarch Butterfly in North America" by F.A. Urquhart, Professor, Un. of Toronto, Canada, Dezember 1970 (click HERE)
  • (A-3) IOWA COUPLE CREATED THE ULTIMATE IN MONARCH WAYSTATIONS (click HERE)
  • (A-2) HAPPENINGS AT WAYSTATION NO. 613 (AN ONGOING DIARY) (click HERE)
  • (A-1) HELP RESEARCHERS STUDY OE PARASITE HARMING MONARCH BUTTERFLIES-letter from Sonia Altizer (click HERE)
  • B) GOING NATIVE: URBAN LANDSCAPING FOR WILDLIFE WITH NATIVE PLANTS (click HERE)
  • (C) CLOCKS, CRYPTOCHROMES & MONARCH MIGRATIONS (click HERE)
  • (D) WATCH NOVA'S "THE INCREDIBLE JOURNEY OF THE BUTTERFLIES...HERE IT IS! (click HERE)
  • (E) RELAX...AND WATCH THIS SLIDE SHOW WITH MUSIC...RELAX...AND APPRECIATE NATURE (click HERE)
  • (F) PHOTOGRAPHING BIRDS IS FUN! LOVE THE MUSIC TOO (click HERE)
  • (G) CREATE A WILDLIFE FRIENDLY YARD & HAPPENINGS AT MONARCH WAYSTATION NO. 613 (click HERE)
Peanut Butter Powder

SIGNS OF HOPE FOR THE MONARCH BUTTERFLY!

     According to ABC News, there are tentative signs of hope for the mass migration of monarch butterflies, whose numbers dropped to their lowest level ever last year. The first wave of Monarchs to arrive in Mexico's nature reserves have arrived earlier than usual this year, according to Luis Fueyo, who keeps tabs of them there. He said it's too early to say whether butterfly numbers will rebound this year from a series of sharp drops, but noted "this premature presence could be the prelude to an increase in the migration."
     Let's hope so! He said the first butterflies have been sighted in the northern border state of Coahuila. Most normally arrive in October from the United States and Canada. The experts will wait to make a definitive count after the butterflies have settled in completely, something that usually occurs by December.
     In February, Mexico, the United States and Canada agreed to form working groups on the conservation of Monarch butterflies, after steep and steady declines in the previous three years. Last year, the black-and-orange butterflies covered only 1.65 acres (0.67 hectares) in the pine and fir forests west of Mexico City, down from more than 44.5 acres (18 hectares) at their recorded peak in 1996. Because they clump together by the thousands in trees, counting individuals in near impossible; instead they are counted by the area they cover.
     The head of international affairs for Mexico's Environment Department, Enrique Lendo Fuentes, said the three nations "will probably have a joint plan of action before the end of November." The plan, experts said, would be to create a corridor of milkweed-friendly areas along the entire three-nation migratory route. That is important, because the butterfly has to reproduce along the way; the same generation doesn't make the entire trip.
SWAMP MILKWEED PLANTED IN MY YARD
     For its part, Mexico has already taken a number of steps, like setting up a network of observers to track monarchs from the time they enter the country, to try to identify milkweed patches that the butterflies might use along their way to their mountain wintering grounds. Activists have launched a web site where Mexicans can report and share sightings.
Monarchs lay eggs on milkweed leaves that hatch into caterpillars, morph into chrysalises and transform into butterflies. The butterfly's dramatic decline is being driven by widespread planting of genetically engineered, herbicide-resistant crops that tend to drastically decrease the amount of milkweed available.
     Mexican writer and environmentalist Homero Aridjis, said the butterflies face a number of challenges, including climate change and illegal logging in Mexico, in addition to the loss of habitat in the United States.
     "We are alarmed, because we don't yet what is going to happen" with butterflies, whose migration — but not the existence of the species — is consider at risk of disappearing.
     "We don't know what size population is going to come" to Mexico, "so we are a little alarmed."
     I hope it's a good year, for I have collected many Monarch eggs off the Common and Swamp Milkweed plants planted in my small, suburban yard in NW Ohio. I released 115 Monarch butterflies this year! Last year, not one egg was laid on them. I was so discouraged by last year's dismal results, that I didn't order Monarch tags from Monarch Watch, so the 115 releases weren't recorded.

Related Posts:
 DEDICATED TO SAVING THE MONARCH BUTTERFLY
MONARCH WAYSTATION ATTRACTS MONARCHS TO YARD
 
Create A Wildlife-Friendly Yard (CWFY) is dedicated to saving the Monarch Butterfly. We want to hear from you! Press HERE to contact us. 

Contact CWFY- We'd enjoy hearing from you!

foxyform

Monday, March 3, 2014

EARTHJUSTICE BATTLES UNREGULATEDD TOXIC CHEMICALS

 
Toxics: Fighting for Healthy Communities
An Earthjustice Teleconference

More than 80,000 chemicals are currently approved for use in the United States, and over 15,000 are "secret." The vast majority have never been tested for safety. The U.S. often allows industry free rein while communities are left in the dark about what is in their water, air, and household products.
Earthjustice is fighting at the national and regional level to protect human health from pollutants and toxic chemicals. We fight for healthy communities by strengthening standards and protections and holding polluters accountable.
Join Earthjustice Managing Attorney Marianne Engelman Lado for a teleconference on how we’re working to fix a broken toxics regulatory system and to lift the secrecy around chemical safety.
Here are the Teleconference details: It will be held on Thursday, March 13, 2014 (11:30 AM- 12:30 PM Pacific Time)  Email: events@earthjustice.org